Search Your Word

Sponsored links

The Definition of - blood (noun)

    noun
    1.
    the fluid that circulates in the principal vascular system of human beings and other vertebrates, in humans consisting of plasma in which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets are suspended.
    2.
    the vital principle; life:
    The excitement had got into the very blood of the nation.
    3.
    a person or group regarded as a source of energy, vitality, or vigor:
    It's time we got some new blood in this company.
    4.
    one of the four elemental bodily humors of medieval physiology, regarded as causing cheerfulness.
    5.
    bloodshed; gore; slaughter; murder:
    to avenge the blood of his father.
    6.
    the juice or sap of plants:
    the blood of the grape.
    7.
    temperament; state of mind:
    a person of hot blood.
    8.
    physical nature of human beings:
    the frailty of our blood.
    9.
    Chiefly British. a high-spirited dandy; an adventuresome youth:
    the young bloods of Cambridge.
    10.
    a profligate or rake.
    11.
    physical and cultural extraction:
    It was a trait that seemed to be in their blood.
    12.
    royal extraction:
    a prince of the blood.
    13.
    descent from a common ancestor; ancestry; lineage:
    related by blood.
    14.
    recorded and respected ancestry; purebred breeding.
    15.
    Slang. a black person, especially a man.
    verb (used with object)
    16.
    Hunting. to give (hounds) a first sight or taste of blood.
    Compare flesh (def 14).
    17.
    to stain with blood.
    Idioms
    18.
    get / have one's blood up, to become or be enraged or impassioned:
    Injustice of any sort always gets my blood up.
    19.
    have someone's blood on one's head / hands, to be to blame for someone's affliction or death:
    Though a criminal, he had no blood on his hands.
    20.
    in cold blood, deliberately; ruthlessly:
    The dictator, in cold blood, ordered the execution of all his political enemies.
    21.
    make one's blood boil, to inspire resentment, anger, or indignation:
    Such carelessness makes my blood boil.
    22.
    make one's blood run cold, to fill with terror; frighten:
    The dark, deserted street in that unfamiliar neighborhood made her blood run cold.
    23.
    sweat blood. sweat (def 37).
    24.
    taste blood, to experience a new sensation, usually a violent or destructive one, and acquire an appetite for it:
    Once the team had tasted blood, there was no preventing them from winning by a wide margin.

Word Example of - blood

    Example Sentences for blood

    Yes, I had it in the blood, on account of my grandfather, I suppose.

    If you touch the leaves, they escape; but when crushed no blood comes from them.

    The blood had flown violently to his neck, which was burning him.

    They are callous to the sight of blood and suffering and come to positively 182enjoy it.

    The blood, which was running down his leg, made a little pool at his feet.

    The lust of blood is a frightful demon when once it is aroused.

    The Jews answered, 'His blood be on us and on our children.'

    The custom of blood revenge was a protection to all who were in a group of kinsmen.

    From one wound in the wrist the blood spurted with each beat of the pulse.

    One's mother's brother is not in one's kin, and there is no duty of blood revenge for him.

Word Origin & History of - blood

    Word Origin & History

    blood O.E. blod, from P.Gmc. *blodam (cf. O.Fris. blod, O.N. bloð, M.Du. bloet, O.H.G. bluot, Ger. Blut, Goth. bloþ), from PIE *bhlo-to-, perhaps meaning "to swell, gush, spurt," or "that which bursts out" (cf. Goth. bloþ "blood," bloma "flower"), in which case it wo7uld be from suffixed form of *bhle-, extended form of *bhel- "to thrive, bloom" (see bole). There seems to have been an avoidance in Germanic, perhaps from taboo, of other PIE words for "blood," such as *esen- (cf. poetic Gk. ear, O.Latin aser, Skt. asrk, Hittite eshar); also *krew-, which seems to have had a sense ...of "blood outside the body, gore from a wound" (cf. L. cruour "blood from a wound," Gk. kreas "meat"), which came to mean simply "blood" in the Balto-Slavic group and some other languages. Inheritance and relationship senses (also found in L. sanguis, Gk. haima) emerged in English by mid-13c. As the seat of passions, it is recorded from c.1300. Slang meaning "hot spark, a man of fire" [Johnson] is from 1560s. Blood money is from 1530s.

Sponsored links