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fault Meaning in English

Check the latest meaning and definition of fault below.

The Definition of - fault (verb)

    noun
    1.
    a defect or imperfection; flaw; failing:
    a fault in the brakes; a fault in one's character.
    2.
    responsibility for failure or a wrongful act:
    It is my fault that we have not finished.
    3.
    an error or mistake:
    a fault in addition.
    4.
    a misdeed or transgression:
    to confess one's faults.
    5.
    Sports.
    1. a ball that when served does not land in the proper section of an opponent's court.
    2. a failure to serve the ball according to the rules, as from within a certain area.
    6.
    Geology, Mining. a break in the continuity of a body of rock or of a vein, with dislocation along the plane of the fracture (fault plane)
    7.
    Manège. (of a horse jumping in a show) any of a number of improper executions in negotiating a jump, as a tick, knockdown, refusal, or run-out.
    8.
    Electricity. a partial or total local failure in the insulation or continuity of a conductor or in the functioning of an electric system.
    9.
    Hunting. a break in the line of scent; a losing of the scent; check.
    10.
    Obsolete. lack; want.
    verb (used without object)
    11.
    to commit a fault; blunder; err.
    12.
    Geology. to undergo faulting.
    verb (used with object)
    13.
    Geology. to cause a fault in.
    14.
    to find fault with, blame, or censure.
    Idioms
    15.
    at fault,
    1. open to censure; blameworthy:
      to be at fault for a mistake.
    2. in a dilemma; puzzled:
      to be at fault as to where to go.
    3. (of hounds) unable to find the scent.
    16.
    find fault, to seek and make known defects or flaws; complain; criticize:
    He constantly found fault with my behavior.
    17.
    to a fault, to an extreme degree; excessively:
    She was generous to a fault.

Word Example of - fault

    Example Sentences for fault

    Moreover, the saddest of precisians could find no fault with the conduct of the shop.

    The probability was that she had no one to blame but herself—if fault there was.

    It wasn't his fault, and he wouldn't take the blame; he was only going by orders all the time.

    Why, it would be simply monstrous if your career were spoilt through no fault of your own.

    She is sold for no fault, but simply because her owner must have money.

    Through no fault of her own, she is placed in a difficult position.

    "This is their misfortune or failing, not the fault of the system," returned Ida.

    "It's more than half your fault," went on the man on the real side of the mirror.

    If the countryman does not live on the best the fault is his own.

    If the expedition fails to get a good catch, the fault is laid to the men.

Word Origin & History of - fault

    Word Origin & History

    fault late 13c., "deficiency," from O.Fr. faute "lack, deficiency," from V.L. *fallita "a shortcoming, falling," noun use of fem. pp., from L. falsus, pp. of fallere "deceive, disappoint" (see false). The -l- was restored 1400s, probably in imitation of L., but was not pronounced till 18c. Sense of "physical defect" is from early 14c.; that of "moral culpability" is first recorded late 14c. Geological sense is from 1796. The use in tennis (c.1600) is closer to the etymological sense. The verb is first recorded 1550s in the sense "to find fault with." Related: Faulted; faulter; faulting.