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The Definition of - grandfather (noun)

    noun
    1.
    the father of one's father or mother.
    2.
    a forefather.
    3.
    the founder or originator of a family, species, type, etc.; the first of one's or its kind, or the one being longest in existence:
    the grandfather of all steam locomotives.
    verb (used with object)
    4.
    to exempt (something or someone) from new legislation, restrictions, or requirements:
    The law grandfathered all banks already operating at the time of passage. He was grandfathered into the pension plan.

Word Example of - grandfather

    Example Sentences for grandfather

    Yes, I had it in the blood, on account of my grandfather, I suppose.

    With considerable of a to-do, Mrs. Norris announced the gift of a grandfather's clock.

    I've got the grandfather of all headaches, and I won't be able to think straight for a week.

    They will receive it as a gift from their brothers, instead of as their due from their grandfather.

    Grandfather had such respect for her judgment that I knew he would not go against her.

    The old house had been the home of his grandfather, but he had never lived in it.

    Do you mean we ain't going to be pore any longer, grandfather?

    Of course his grandfather would not be able to bear him out of his sight.

    Eva allays his astonishment, saying that the grandfather came with her, and we go upstairs.

    It'll make mother friends with grandfather, and get you adopted.

Word Origin & History of - grandfather

    Word Origin & History

    grandfather early 15c., from grand + father. Replaced O.E. ealdefæder. The use of grand- in compounds, with the sense of "a generation older than, or younger than," is first attested early 13c., in Anglo-Fr. graund dame "grandmother." Latin and Greek had similar usages. Grandmother also first attested early 15c., from M.Fr.; grandchild, grandson are later (16c.). The verb grandfather is from 1900. Grandfather clock is c.1880, from the popular song; they were previously known as tall case clocks or eight-day clocks.

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