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Word Example of - higher

    Example Sentences for higher

    In this land the earth is higher than in any other; and that makes it very cold.

    But there's no higher mentality to develop—not a trace of empathy.

    Every tender emotion of love is a prayer, pure and potent, for a higher life.

    Bruce was as good a rocker as a Chinaman, and than that there is no higher praise.

    Divinity is all the while thinking about something infinitely better and higher.

    They live on a lofty plane and labour for the spreading of the Higher Light.

    Of course his prices are higher than you would pay in London; but he will not supply you with anything that is untrustworthy.

    In it peace and harmony are given a higher place than sex interests.

    For women would worry about higher culture as much as they worry about everything else.

    All the higher religions show a tendency to degenerate back to it.

Word Origin & History of - higher

    Word Origin & History

    high O.E. heh (Anglian), heah (W.Saxon) "of great height, lofty, tall, exalted," from P.Gmc. *kaukhaz (cf. O.S. hoh, O.N. har, Dan. høi, Swed. hög, O.Fris. hach, Du. hoog, O.H.G. hoh, Ger. hoch, Goth. hauhs "high;" also Ger. Hügel "hill," O.N. haugr "mound"), from PIE *koukos (cf. Lith. kaukara "hill"). Spelling with -gh represents a final guttural sound, lost since 14c. Meaning "euphoric or exhilarated from alcohol" is first attested 1620s, of drugs, first recorded 1932. Sense of "proud, haughty, supercilious" (c.1200) is reflected in high hand (late 14c.) and high horse (see ...horse). High seas first attested late 14c., with sense (also found in the L. cognate) of "deep" as well as "tall" (cf. also O.Pers. baran "height, depth"). High-class (adj.) is from 1864. To high-tail "move quickly" is slang attested by 1890, from cattle ranches (animals fleeing with elevated tails). Highlands "mountainous district of Scotland" first recorded early 15c. High-roller "extravagant spender" is from 1881. Your Highness as a form of address to English royalty is attested from c.1400.

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